Feedstock Development projects

Diversifying Potential Cellulosic Perennial Feedstocks with Prairie Cordgrass

Energy crop diversification at the landscape level wiII be an important factor for the sustainable cellulosic biomass feedstock and biofuel production system. Prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata) is a native warm-season grass that grows well on poorly drained and/or salt-affected soils and has potential of biomass yield up to 20 Mg ha-l in northern environments. However, very limited information is available for genetic resources and management strategies for maximizing biomass production of prairie cordgrass. It has a strong potential for feedstock production, and this project is determining the best genetic resources for developing improved populations and cultivars across multiple locations and growing seasons. The team is identifying the best planting systems and management practices for sustainable prairie cordgrass biomass production in land not suitable for traditional row crops or other perennial prairie grasses (Started in 2012).

project Highlights

2014 Highlights

The long-term goal of this project is to develop prairie cordgrass as a dedicated feedstock for marginal lands associated with abiotic stresses. The objectives of this study were to: 1) evaluate natural populations for biomass yield, performance, and genetic variability to improve biomass production, 2) evaluate prairie cordgrass biomass production under abiotic stresses and select populations for abiotic stress tolerance, and 3) determine best management practices for sustainable prairie cordgrass biomass production. All field trials were successfully established and we are collecting data at present. All field studies will be compiled with data collected from the growing season of 2014, and the 3-year project will be completed. Based on our observation and preliminary results, we confirmed prairie cordgrass has the potential of high biomass yield under various stress conditions including high soil salinity and waterlogging.

2013 Highlights

The long-term goal of this project is to develop prairie cordgrass as a dedicated feedstock for marginal lands associated with abiotic stresses. The objectives of this study were to 1) evaluate natural populations for biomass yield, performance, and genetic variability to improve biomass production; 2) evaluate prairie cordgrass biomass production under abiotic stresses and select populations for abiotic stress tolerance; and 3) determine best management practices for sustainable prairie cordgrass biomass production. All field trials were successfully established and we are collecting data at present. Based on our observation and preliminary results, we confirmed prairie cordgrass has the potential of high biomass yield under various stress conditions including high soil salinity and waterlogging.

2012 Highlights

The degree of drought was extreme during the growing season of 2012. Therefore, overall performance of most crops was lower and seed production was much lower than normal years. However, prairie cordgrass biomass yields were close to normal since over 50% of prairie cordgrass growth development was completed by June, before the extreme drought started in this region of Illinois. This differs greatly from the expected corn harvest, which is expected to be about 30% lower than last year due to the drought occurring during a major portion of corn development.

 

All field data collection from various nurseries established at the EBI Energy Farm has been completed for the 2011-12 growing season, and all data is being compiled for publications. Based on two-year field data, advanced germplams are selected for further improvement. Our first cultivar “Savoy” seed production field was successfully established. Also, a new field trial was initiated in Pecos, Texas to evaluate prairie cordgrass for biomass yield potential and performance under saline water irrigation. The trial was successfully established and field data will be collected from 2013.

Publications

Published in 2014

Determining Effects of Sodicity and Salinity on Switchgrass and Prairie Cordgrass, Eric K. Anderson, Thomas B. Voigt, S. Kim, D.K. Lee, Industrial Crops and Products, doi: 10.1016/j.indcrop.2014.11.016, Nov. 29, 2014.

 

Switchgrass and Prairie Cordgrass Response to Foliar and Soil-Applied Herbicides, Eric K. Anderson, Aaron G. Hager, Thomas B. Voigt, and D.K. Lee, Weed Technology, doi: 10.1614/WT-D-14-00014.1, 2014. 

Published in 2013

Seed Set in Prairie Cordgrass (Spartina pectinata Link), A. Boe, V. N. Owens,  J. Gonzalez-Hernandez, D. K. Lee, Crop Science 53, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.2135/cropsci2012.04.0250

 

Chloroplast DNA Intraspecific Phylogeography of Prairie Cordgrass (Spartina pectinata Bosc ex Link), S. Kim, A. L. Rayburn, T. B. Voigt, M. L. Ainouche, A. K. Ainouche, D. K. Lee, Plant Molecular Biology Report, 31(6), pp. 1376-1383.

Published in 2012

Cytogeographic Distribution and Genome Size Variation in Prairie Cordgrass (Spartina pectinata Bosc ex Link), S.M. Kim, A.L. Rayburn, A. Parrish, and D.K. Lee, Plant Molecular Biology Reporter 7:1-13, doi: 10.1007/511105-012-0414-x, 2012.

 

Seed Set in Prairie Cordgrass (Spartina pectinata Link), Arvid Boe, Vance Owens, Jose Gonzalez-Hernandez, and D.K. Lee, Crop Science 53: 1-8, doi: 10.2135/cropsci2012.04.0250, November 14, 2012.

 

Neopolyploidy in Spartina pectinata Link: Morphological Analysis of Tetraploid and Hexaploid Plants in a Mixed Natural Population, Sumin Kim, A.L Rayburn, Arvid Boe, and D.K. Lee, Plant Systematics & Evolutiondoi: 10.1007/s00606-012-0617-5, June 2012.

 

Seed Reduction in Prairie Cordgrass, Spartina pectinata Link, By the Floret-Feeding Caterpillar Aethes spartina (Barnes and McDunnough), Jarrod R. Prasifka, D. K. Lee, J.D. Bradshaw, Allen S. Parrish, and Michael E. Gray, Bioenergy Researchdoi: 10.1007/s12155-011-9120-z, March 2012.

 

Salinity Effects on Germination and Plant Growth of Prairie Cordgrass and Switchgrass, Sumin Kim, A. L. Rayburn, Thomas Voigt, Allen Parrish, and D. K. Lee, BioEnergy Research, 5 (1): 225-235, March 2012.


Back

Back to Top